If you’re selling a home, having high quality photos is one of the most important things you can do to catch the eye of prospective buyers. Taking great photos, however, is something that requires a combination of frequent practice and knowledge of how your camera works. Sure, these days you can take a decent photo with an iPhone camera and be done with it. While that method is a good start, if you want to progress with your photography you’ll eventually have to make the leap to a DSLR where you have more freedom to change exposure settings.

I know what you’re thinking. High quality photos means spending a ton of money on camera equipment, right? Fortunately, entry level DSLR cameras have become more affordable in recent years. To start taking great photos you’ll only need four things: your DSLR camera, a tripod, a wide angle lens, and a place to practice your photography.

Step 1: Setting up

You’ll want to set up the room with the right balance of furniture, decorations and natural light. Avoid decorations that are too personal (like family photos) or eccentric (no stuffed animals, preferably).

Set up your tripod against one of the walls of the room. Ideally, you’ll have the target of your photo illuminated by natural light coming through windows, so you’ll likely be standing in front of or next to the windows. However, before you take any photos use your best judgment to determine the room’s best angles. The amount of and the placement of furniture will play a large role in how spacious the room looks, but equally important is the camera angle from which you take your photos.

Step 2: Learn your camera settings

You won’t learn all of the settings in a DSLR overnight, but it is important to get an understanding of the basics. In spite of the many technical improvements that have been made, the basic concept of a camera hasn’t changed much over the years. The two main components that determine what your picture looks like are aperture and shutter speed.

Aperture (or “f-stop”) is what is used to determine how much light enters the camera. Much like your pupils dilate in the dark to let in as much light as possible, having a wide aperture will allow you to take brighter photos.

Shutter speed is the amount of time the shutter on your camera is open. A slower shutter speed allows more light into the camera, creating a brighter exposure. However, due to our inability to hold a camera entirely still having a slower shutter speed creates more opportunity for your photo to become blurred from camera shake.

A third important setting is the ISO. This setting is unique to digital photography because it controls the sensitivity of the camera’s image sensor. The higher the number, the more sensitive. Why not just crank it up all the way then to get the best quality? Because if you set it too high the photos become grainy or “noisy.”

Step 3: Practice

Now that you know the basics, start taking photos in your home using various camera settings. Play around with taking photos with different light sources on, with your camera flash on and off, and at different times of day. You’ll find that there are endless possibilities when it comes to taking photos of your home.

 

Tagged with:
 

Although it may seem like the Internet and email have always been an integral part of our daily lives, those modes of modern communication have only been around for the past two decades or so.

With technology like video teleconferencing, online document sharing, and other collaborative tools becoming commonplace in the business arena, more and more companies are allowing (and even encouraging) their employees to work from home — at least a couple days a week. For better or worse, many employees, managers, and executives are putting in lots of overtime from their home offices.

Whether you’re telecommuting for a job or running your own home-based business, having a dedicated work space can make all the difference in your ability to stay focused and productive. Not only can you control distractions by closing the door, but having a separate work space at home makes it easier to stay organized and maintain a professional image. Depending on the layout of your house, the cooperation of your family, and neighborhood zoning regulations, it may even be possible to meet with clients at your home office.

While some people don’t have a problem setting up their laptop and working at the kitchen table, in their bedroom, or the living room, problems can arise when your spouse or other members of the family want to use your temporary work space for something else!

Other potential complications are possible, too: When people in your household have easy access to your computer, work files, and research materials, there’s also the possibility of accidentally losing unsaved documents, unfinished emails being prematurely sent or closed, and having to deal with spills, sticky surfaces, misplaced work materials, and other miscellaneous mishaps! On the other hand, setting aside a dedicated work space at home for tackling office projects, preparing reports, or creating client proposals can help you avoid losing valuable work, missing deadlines, and looking unprofessional.

Home Offices Are a Selling Point

In addition to making your own life more organized and less chaotic, there’s also the advantage of increasing your home’s marketability. If you happen to be considering putting your house on the market now or in the near future, having a dedicated office space will help make your home look more appealing to potential buyers.

Today, more than ever, the idea of having a home office is on many people’s minds and priority lists — or at least, their “wish list”. When prospective buyers can envision ways in which your home can meet their lifestyle goals, business objectives, and career requirements, they’ll be a lot more likely to seriously consider making an offer on your house.

As more and more people pursue work-at-home options, freelancing opportunities, advanced degrees, and home-based businesses, a dedicated office space will continue to be a highly desirable feature for both current and future home owners.

Set your Twitter account name in your settings to use the TwitterBar Section.